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7 Health Benefits Of Potatoes

Last updated May 27, 2016

The potato (Solanum Tuberosum) is a member of the Nightshade family, native to the Americas, most likely in the Andes, Peru, and Bolivia. The term “potato” can refer to either the plant or the entire tuber. The potato is the most popular tuber in the world because it is a storehouse of energy, vitamins, minerals, and organic compounds.


The potato (Solanum Tuberosum) is a member of the Nightshade family, native to the Americas, most likely in the Andes, Peru, and Bolivia. The term “potato” can refer to either the plant or the entire tuber. The potato is the most popular tuber in the world because it is a storehouse of energy, vitamins, minerals, and organic compounds.

Here are the 7 health benefits of potatoes.

1.     Potatoes are easy to digest.

Because potatoes are high in carbohydrates, they are easy to digest and facilitate digestion. Potatoes also contain a significant amount of fiber. Fiber stimulates the peristaltic motion and increased secretion of gastric juices, which eases digestion, prevents conditions like constipation, and protects the body from more serious conditions like colorectal cancer.

2.     Potatoes can help individuals gain weight.

Consuming potatoes are an excellent way to gain weight because of the high-carbohydrate, low-protein content. The vitamin content includes vitamin C and B-complex, which can also help in the proper absorption of carbohydrates.

3.     Potatoes are beneficial for blood pressure.

Potatoes are high in potassium and low in sodium, which lowers blood pressure and combats hypertension. Also, the fiber content in potatoes is helpful in lowering cholesterol and improves the performance of insulin in the body, which aids in the lowering of blood pressure.

4.     Potatoes can help protect against rheumatism.

Vitamins found in potatoes like the calcium and magnesium help to provide relief from rheumatism. Also, the water found in boiling potatoes can reduce pain and inflammation of rheumatism.

5.     Potatoes could help fight against cancer.

Some varieties of potatoes like red and russet potatoes contain high levels of flavonoid antioxidants, like zeaxanthin and carotenes, and vitamin A. Also, studies have shown that a compound found in potatoes called quercetin, has anticancer and antitumor properties.

6.     Potatoes can help improve brain function.

Potatoes are rich in starch, which is the perfect energy source for the brain. Also, the vitamin-B complex, amino acid, and fatty acids found in potatoes that are vital for the cognitive ability and performance of the brain.

7.     Potatoes protect the body from kidney stones.

Potatoes contain magnesium that helps inhibit the accumulation or deposition of calcium in the kidney and other tissues, thereby proving beneficial for the treatment of kidney stones. 

References:

  1. Potato, baked, flesh and skin, without salt Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Retrieved August 14, 2017, from http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2770/2
  2. Pihlanto, A., Akkanen, S., & Korhonen, H. J. (2008). ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant properties of potato (Solanum tuberosum). Food Chemistry109(1), 104-112.
  3. Al‐Saikhan, M. S., Howard, L. R., & Miller, J. C. (1995). Antioxidant activity and total phenolics in different genotypes of potato (Solanum tuberosum, L.). Journal of Food Science60(2), 341-343.
  4. Choi, E. M. (2007). Suppressive Effects of Potato (Solanum tuberlosum) on Type Ⅱ Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice. Food Science and Biotechnology.
  5. Shapiro, S. S., & Saliou, C. (2001). Role of vitamins in skin care. Nutrition17(10), 839-844.
  6. Björck, I., Granfeldt, Y., Liljeberg, H., Tovar, J., & Asp, N. G. (1994). Food properties affecting the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates. The American journal of clinical nutrition59(3), 699S-705S.
  7. Drewnowski, A., Kurth, C., Holden-Wiltse, J., & Saari, J. (1992). Food preferences in human obesity: carbohydrates versus fats. Appetite18(3), 207-221.

Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: July 26, 2014
Last updated: May 27, 2016