×

Please Remove Adblock
Adverts are the main source of Revenue for DoveMed. Please remove adblock to help us create the best medical content found on the Internet.

Adult Inclusion Conjunctivitis (AIC)

Last updated April 6, 2021

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Adult Chlamydial Conjunctivitis is a type of bacterial conjunctivitis that is caused by the bacteria chlamydia trachomatis, which is responsible for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in adults.


The topic Adult Inclusion Conjunctivitis (AIC) you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Adult Chlamydial Conjunctivitis.

Quick Summary:

  • The cause factors for Conjunctivitis are many; however, Bacterial Conjunctivitis is caused by any of the several types of bacteria, such as staphylococcus aureus, streptococcus pneumoniae, and hemophilus influenzae among others. It is one of the most common types of Conjunctivitis that affects healthy individuals
  • Adult Chlamydial Conjunctivitis is a type of bacterial conjunctivitis that is caused by the bacteria chlamydia trachomatis, which is responsible for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in adults. The acute eye disorder is also termed as Chlamydial Inclusion Conjunctivitis in Adults
  • Conjunctivitis is inflammation of conjunctiva of the eye, which is the membrane covering the white region of the eye
  • In Conjunctivitis the white part of the eye turns red or pink, and hence it is also known as Pink Eye. The infection may affect either one, or both the eyes, and is accompanied by inflammation, irritation, with watery discharge from the eyes. Under normal circumstances, Conjunctivitis does not affect vision
  • Urgent care with medication is essential to prevent permanent blindness and other potential complications from developing, due to the infection

Please find comprehensive information on Adult Chlamydial Conjunctivitis regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

What are some Useful Resources for Additional Information?


References and Information Sources used for the Article:


Helpful Peer-Reviewed Medical Articles:


Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: Sept. 12, 2017
Last updated: April 6, 2021