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7 Health Benefits Of Jujube

Last updated Sept. 22, 2017

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Ton Rulkens

The jujube (Ziziphus jujube), also known as a red jujube, Chinese jujube, Korean jujube, or Indian jujube, is a species of Ziziphus in the buckthorn family (Rhamnaceae). The origin is still known; however jujubes are cultivated in many regions like southern Asia, between Lebanon, Iran, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, the Korean peninsula, and southern and central China, and also southeastern Europe.


The jujube (Ziziphus jujube), also known as a red jujube, Chinese jujube, Korean jujube, or Indian jujube, is a species of Ziziphus in the buckthorn family (Rhamnaceae). The origin is still known; however, jujubes are cultivated in many regions like southern Asia, between Lebanon, Iran, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, the Korean peninsula, and south and central China, and southeastern Europe. The fresh jujube can be candied and eaten as a snack with coffee. People also use jujubes to make jam.

Here are 7 health benefits of jujube.

1.     Jujubes are helpful for improving bone health. 

Jujubes contain minerals, such as manganese, copper, and magnesium, which are essential for healthy bone development and strength, particularly as people begin to age, and their bones gradually weaken.

2.     Jujubes can help fight anemia.

Copper and iron are essential for the new blood cell formation. The high level of iron balances out the inherent lack of iron in anemic patients, increasing energy and strength while decreasing feelings of fatigue and lethargy.

3.     Jujubes can help maintain a healthy blood pressure.

Jujubes are loaded with potassium and a low content of sodium. One hundred grams of jujubes contain 250 milligrams of potassium, compared to 3.0 milligrams of sodium. This helps the blood vessels relax and maintains proper blood pressure.

4.     Jujubes can help improve digestive health.

Fiber aids to prevent constipation, making one’s bowel movement easier to manage. Fiber can also scrape cholesterol out of the arteries and blood vessels. The daily recommended dietary fiber intake for men and women are 38 grams and 25 grams, respectively.

5.     Jujubes can help individuals sleep better at night.

Jujubes have been known to help an individual sleep with its high content of magnesium, which is a mineral that is directly linked to improving the quality, duration, and tranquility of sleep. Jujubes also help regulate the metabolism, to help reduce sleep disorders and the occurrence of insomnia. 

6.     Jujubes can help protect the hair and skin.

Sufficient vitamin C intake does not only improve the immune system but can also create and maintain collagen, an essential protein found in hair and skin. Also, a high vitamin C content helps heal wounds and injuries to the body rapidly. One cup of jujubes has 115 percent of the vitamin C daily requirements.

7.     Jujubes can help individuals fight infections. 

Vitamin C is a potent natural water-soluble antioxidant that helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and eliminates cancer-causing free radicals in the body. This is done by stimulating the activity of white blood cells and acting as an antioxidant to defend against the harmful effects of free radicals.

Aside from the fighting infections with vitamin C, jujubes contain a special enzyme called bromelain that is associated with reducing phlegm and mucus build up in the respiratory tracts and sinus cavities.

References:

  1. Jujube, raw Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Retrieved September 22, 2017, from http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1932/2
  2. Houston, M. C. (2011). The importance of potassium in managing hypertension. Current hypertension reports13(4), 309-317.
  3. Cogswell, M. E., Zhang, Z., Carriquiry, A. L., Gunn, J. P., Kuklina, E. V., Saydah, S. H., ... & Moshfegh, A. J. (2012). Sodium and potassium intakes among US adults: NHANES 2003–2008. The American journal of clinical nutrition96(3), 647-657.
  4. Buttriss, J. L., & Stokes, C. S. (2008). Dietary fibre and health: an overview. Nutrition Bulletin33(3), 186-200.
  5. Howarth, N. C., Saltzman, E., & Roberts, S. B. (2001). Dietary fiber and weight regulation. Nutrition reviews59(5), 129-139.
  6. Whelton, P. K., He, J., Cutler, J. A., Brancati, F. L., Appel, L. J., Follmann, D., & Klag, M. J. (1997). Effects of oral potassium on blood pressure: meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Jama277(20), 1624-1632.
  7. Barnes, M. J. (1975). Function of ascorbic acid in collagen metabolism. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences258(1), 264-277.
  8. Nagy, S. (1980). Vitamin C contents of citrus fruit and their products: a review. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry28(1), 8-18.

Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: Sept. 7, 2014
Last updated: Sept. 22, 2017