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Kidney Disease: Report Assesses Mammoth Problem For The United States

Last updated April 15, 2016

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

"This report is a one-stop shop to try to understand the prevalence of kidney disease, how it's being treated and how the burden affects various populations."


A sweeping new report assessing chronic kidney disease in the United States offers startling statistics about a condition that affects almost 14 percent of the U.S. population and costs billions in Medicare spending each year.

"This report is a one-stop shop to try to understand the prevalence of kidney disease, how it's being treated and how the burden affects various populations," said researcher Rajesh Balkrishnan, PhD, of the University of Virginia School of Medicine. "If we can identify which treatment modalities are working and how they're used and link these treatments to outcomes, we can inform the government of the most cost-effective ways to manage and treat the growing burden of kidney disease in the U.S."

Underappreciated Ailments

The massive, two-volume report looks at both chronic kidney disease -- the loss of kidney function over time -- and potentially deadly kidney failure, known as end-stage renal disease. In 2013, Medicare spending for end-stage renal disease increased to $31 billion, in addition to $50 billion spent on chronic kidney disease among those 65 and older.

Balkrishnan, of UVA's Department of Public Health Sciences, led the report's analysis of prescription drug use and cost. His findings include:

  • In 2013, spending on prescriptions for Medicare Part D patients with chronic kidney disease was 46 percent higher than for general Medicare patients ($3,675 per patient versus $2,509).
  • Spending for prescriptions for Part D patients with end-stage renal disease was significantly greater still: At $6,673 per patient per year, spending was 2.6 times higher than for general Medicare patients. Dialysis patients had the greatest cost, $7,142 per person per year.
  • Spending for Part D-covered medications was more than twice as high for chronic kidney disease patients who received Medicare's low-income subsidy than for those who didn't ($6,088 versus $2,873). Out-of-pocket costs were only 1 percent to 2 percent for patients who received the subsidy, while patients who didn't receive the subsidy paid 28 percent to 32 percent.
  • More than 69 percent (69.4 percent) of Medicare patients with chronic kidney disease were enrolled in Medicare Part D. More than 74 percent (74.2 percent) of patients with end-stage renal disease were enrolled in Part D.

Balkrishnan hopes the report will inform national healthcare policy and improve the quality of care for patients with kidney disease. "Our goal is to provide a snapshot view of the major issues in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease in the U.S.," Balkrishnan said. "There are definitely gaps there in the treatment of many patients, which can be improved upon."



The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Virginia Health SystemNote: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Disclaimer: DoveMed is not responsible for the adapted accuracy of news releases posted to DoveMed by contributing universities and institutions.

Primary Resource:

Saran, R., Li, Y., Robinson, B., Abbott, K. C., Agodoa, L. Y., Ayanian, J., ... & Eggers, P. W. (2016). US Renal Data System 2015 Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney Disease in the United States. American journal of kidney diseases: the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation67(3 Suppl 1), A7.

Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: April 15, 2016
Last updated: April 15, 2016