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Cardiac Risk Assessment

Last updated Oct. 8, 2018

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

The Cardiac Risk Assessment test is a preemptive test used to determine the likelihood that an individual will develop cardiovascular disease.


What are the other Names for this Test? (Equivalent Terms)

  • Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk
  • CVD Risk Assessment
  • Heart Disease Risk Assessment 

What is Cardiac Risk Assessment Test? (Background Information)

The Cardiac Risk Assessment test is a preemptive test used to determine the likelihood that an individual will develop cardiovascular disease. It is based on several factors known to be associated with one’s cardiovascular health.

These factors include:

  • Age: An advancing age increases one’s risk
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Family history of heart disease
  • Diabetes; both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes
  • High blood lipid levels (hyperlipidemia)
  • High levels of certain biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) and lipoprotein A (LpA) 

What are the Clinical Indications for performing the Cardiac Risk Assessment Test?

Following are the clinical indications for performing the Cardiac Risk Assessment test:

  • Routine screening for cardiovascular disease
  • Age
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Family history of heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Congenital heart disorders
  • Heart failure 

How is the Specimen Collected for Cardiac Risk Assessment Test?

Following is the specimen collection process for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment:

Sample required: Blood

Process: Insertion of a needle into an arm vein.

Preparation required: No special preparation is needed prior to the test. 

What is the Significance of the Cardiac Risk Assessment Test Result?

  • The presence of any marker(s) associated with cardiovascular disease may indicate an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack (acute myocardial infarction or MI) 

The laboratory test results are NOT to be interpreted as results of a "stand-alone" test. The test results have to be interpreted after correlating with suitable clinical findings and additional supplemental tests/information. Your healthcare providers will explain the meaning of your tests results, based on the overall clinical scenario. 

Additional and Relevant Useful Information:

  • Additional tests, such as an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG), may be used to obtain a more complete assessment of an individual’s risk for cardiovascular diseases 

Certain medications that you may be currently taking may influence the outcome of the test. Hence, it is important to inform your healthcare provider, the complete list of medications (including any herbal supplements) you are currently taking. This will help the healthcare provider interpret your test results more accurately and avoid unnecessary chances of a misdiagnosis.

References and Information Sources used for the Article:


Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: Sept. 20, 2014
Last updated: Oct. 8, 2018