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Pseudobulbar Palsy

Last updated June 18, 2017

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disorder that results in abnormalities in walking, balance, and eye movements. It usually affects adults who are 60 years of age. This neurodegenerative condition is caused by the deterioration of certain brain cells.


The topic Pseudobulbar Palsy you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

Quick Summary:

  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disorder that results in abnormalities in walking, balance, and eye movements. It usually affects adults who are 60 years of age. This neurodegenerative condition is caused by the deterioration of certain brain cells
  • Signs and symptoms associated with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy are problems with balance and frequent falls, stiffness of the body, vision and swallowing difficulties, and mild memory loss (dementia). The diagnosis of PSP includes a complete neurological exam and the use of imaging studies such as MRI scan of the brain
  • The treatment of the disorder may involve medications and supportive therapy, but it cannot be cured. Even though Progressive Supranuclear Palsy is a progressive disorder, the condition generally does not lead to death

Please find comprehensive information on Progressive Supranuclear Palsy regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

What are some Useful Resources for Additional Information on Pseudobulbar Palsy?

BRAIN
P.O. Box 5801, Bethesda, MD 20824
Phone: (800) 352-9424
Website: http://www.ninds.nih.gov

CUREPSP
404 Fifth Avenue 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10018
Phone: (347) 294-2873 (CURE)
Phone: (844) 287-3777 (Canada)
Toll-Free: (800) 457-4777
Fax: (410) 785-7009
Email: info@curepsp.org
Website: http://www.psp.org

References and Information Sources used for Pseudobulbar Palsy:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001772/ (accessed on 6/18/2017)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/psp/detail_psp.htm (accessed on 6/18/2017)

http://www.pspassociation.org.uk/ (accessed on 6/18/2017)

Helpful Peer-Reviewed Medical Articles for Pseudobulbar Palsy:

STEELE, J. C., RICHARDSON, J. C., & OLSZEWSKI, J. (1964). Progressive supranuclear palsy: a heterogeneous degeneration involving the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebellum with vertical gaze and pseudobulbar palsy, nuchal dystonia and dementia. Archives of neurology, 10(4), 333-359.

Rajput, A., & Rajput, A. H. (2001). Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Drugs & aging, 18(12), 913-925.

Kikuchi, H., Doh-ura, K., Kira, J. I., & Iwaki, T. (1999). Preferential neurodegeneration in the cervical spinal cord of progressive supranuclear palsy. Acta neuropathologica, 97(6), 577-584.

Duvoisin, R. C., Golbe, L. I., & Lepore, F. E. (1987). Progressive supranuclear palsy. Can J Neurol Sci, 14(3 Suppl), 547-54.

Duvoisin, R. C. (1994). Differential diagnosis of PSP. In Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Diagnosis, Pathology, and Therapy (pp. 51-67). Springer Vienna.

Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: June 18, 2017
Last updated: June 18, 2017