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Pes Planus

Last updated March 6, 2018

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Adult Acquired Flatfoot (AAF) is a painful condition that results in the progressive flattening of the arch of the foot, which is noticeable when an individual stands up.


The topic Pes Planus you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Adult (Acquired) Flatfoot.

Quick Summary:

  • Adult Acquired Flatfoot (AAF) is a painful condition that results in the progressive flattening of the arch of the foot, which is noticeable when an individual stands up
  • Individuals with flatfoot have no arch on the inside of their feet, allowing the entire foot to touch the floor while standing
  • Many contributing factors that can cause Adult Acquired Flatfoot include damage to the nerves, ligaments, and surrounding tendons of the foot, causing a partial dislocation (subluxation) of the subtalar or talonavicular joints. Another possible cause may be a bone fracture, which results in deformity of the joint, causing the disorder
  • For a majority of the individuals with Adult Acquired Flatfoot, the treatment methods include specialized orthotics and braces. However, if nonsurgical methods do not help relieve the pain, surgery may be used in treating the deformity and symptoms associated with flatfoot
  • The prognosis of individuals with Adult Acquired Flatfoot is usually good, if detected and properly treated early 

Adult Acquired Flatfoot can be classified into four stages: 

  • Stage I: There is a noticeable flatfoot position without any deformity. Pain, inflammation, and swelling of the posterior tibial tendon around the inside of the ankle are common during this stage
  • Stage II: There are visible abnormalities in the foot position when compared to the other foot, indicating that the deformity is beginning to occur. During this stage, the deformity is still treatable non-surgically
  • Stage III: The foot condition progresses to a rigid, non-movable flat foot deformity that is painful, primarily on the outside of the ankle
  • Stage IV: This stage denotes that there is a deformity in the foot and ankle. The abnormality can be moveable or fixed. Frequently, the joints in the foot and ankle show signs of degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) 

Please find comprehensive information on Adult (Acquired) Flatfoot regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

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Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: July 6, 2017
Last updated: March 6, 2018