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Juvenile-Onset Still’s Disease

Last updated Sept. 14, 2017

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic inflammatory disorder that affects the lining of joints, surrounding tissues, and organs, within the body (chiefly the hands and feet), of children and adolescents.


The topic Juvenile-Onset Still’s Disease you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA).

Quick Summary:

  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic inflammatory disorder that affects the lining of joints, surrounding tissues, and organs, within the body (chiefly the hands and feet), of children and adolescents.
  • Unlike the degeneration of cartilage associated with osteoarthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis affects the lining of the joint. This causes excessive pain and swelling, resulting in bone erosion and joint deformity.
  • Children, who develop JRA often experience fatigue, stiffness, and some joint pain.

There are seven types of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis:

  • Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: This type of arthritis affects the child’s entire body. Symptoms often include abnormally high fevers, and the spleen and lymph nodes become enlarged. Eventually, many joints are affected, causing pain, swelling, and stiffness
  • Oligoarthritis: This type of arthritis affects four or fewer joints, with the most common joint affected being the knee and wrist. The two different types of oligoarthritis include persistent and extended, which are determined by the number of joints that are affected
  • Polyarticular Arthritis, Rheumatoid Factor Negative: Is more prevalent in girls than boys and affects five or more joints. The most common joints affected are the small joints within the hand, or weight-bearing joints, such as the knees, hips, ankles, feet, and neck
  • Polyarticular Arthritis, Rheumatoid Factor Positive: This type of arthritis affects only a small percentage of children (approximately 15%, which is about 3% of all children with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis). JRA resembles adult Rheumatoid Arthritis, and children are more likely to experience joint damage with erosions, with this type of JRA, than with the other types
  • Psoriatic Arthritis: Children associated with this type of JRA, show the presence of ‘psoriasis rash’, and may have an immediate family with psoriasis. Fingernails and/or toenails may also be affected by the disorder
  • Enthesitis-Related Arthritis: Enthesitis-Related Arthritis mostly affects the lower extremities and the spine. Children may experience inflammation where tendons attach to the bones, such as where the Achilles tendon attaches to the back of the heel. This JRA type is also included in a specialized group, called juvenile ankylosing spondylitis (where joints within the lower back are inflamed) and arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis)
  • Undifferentiated Arthritis: This type of arthritis does not seem to be associated with any of the other types of arthritis categories, or it may fit into multiple categories. The initial signs of arthritis, which can be subtle or noticeable, may include walking difficulties, tender wrist, finger, or knee. Swelling within the joints may occur suddenly, and the joints may remain swollen. Stiffness of the neck, hips, or other joints can also occur. There may be rashes at multiple locations that appear and disappear spontaneously/suddenly. Abnormally high fevers that tend to increase in the evenings and unexpectedly disappear; characteristics that are similar to Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Please find comprehensive information on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

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First uploaded: Sept. 14, 2017
Last updated: Sept. 14, 2017