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Steps To Help Stop Salt Cravings

Last updated Jan. 4, 2017

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Salt is an electrolyte that helps in maintaining optimal levels of fluids within the body. In order to have proper blood circulation in the body, one needs to consume a little amount of salt every day. When individuals who habitually eat a lot of salty foods cut down on their intake of salt for diet or other health reasons, then salt cravings could occur.


Salt is an electrolyte that helps in maintaining optimal levels of fluids within the body. In order to have proper blood circulation in the body, one needs to consume a little amount of salt every day. When individuals who habitually eat a lot of salty foods cut down on their intake of salt for diet or other health reasons, then salt cravings could occur. Sometimes, there are also certain medical conditions that would cause individuals to crave salt.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that humans have less than 1500 mg of sodium per day. A study by The New England Journal of Medicine showed that people who consumed more than 6000 mg a day had an increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Individuals who consumed a moderate amount of salt in the 3000 to 6000 mg range had lower heart-related events.

There are many measures available by which salt cravings can be cut down. The first step is to drink plenty of water. Drinking water leads to the body being hydrated, which would help one to consume a smaller amount of salt. Celery juice is yet another healthy option available to someone who is looking to halt their salt cravings. Lime is said to bring a sour taste to a meal, which can help one end their salt cravings during a meal. Instead of salt, herbs and other substitutes can be used in cooking that would add extra flavor to a meal. This can also help in curbing salt cravings.

Research by Dr. Robin Felder and a team from the University of Virginia stated that about 25% of people experienced very high blood pressure on high salt diets, while only 11% of people experienced high blood pressure on low salt diets. High blood pressure has several negative impacts on an individual’s. When the salt intake is above the recommended measure, it creates a lot of unhealthy issues in the body such as hypertension. Some opt for a no-salt method of cooking, which is proven to be very effective. Individuals are advised to try and bring down their salt intake content little by little. Avoiding foods with more than 200 mg of sodium per serving can help a lot in limiting one’s desire for salt.

Studies from Cancer Research UK showed that excessive salt consumption can also lead to stomach cancer. Salty foods can cause damage of the stomach lining through inflammation, or make it more sensitive to cancer-causing chemicals. This is among the reasons why individuals must stop their salt craving, as it has been proven to be dangerous to one’s health. With a gradual decreased intake of salt each day, it becomes easier to manage certain health conditions.

References:

http://www.livingwhole.org/causes-of-food-cravings-revealed/ (accessed on 01/31/2015)

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/sodium/art-20045479?pg=2 (accessed on 01/31/2015)

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1311889?query=featured_home (accessed on 01/31/2015)

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/11/04/361202839/to-prevent-kidney-stones-go-easy-on-soda-and-drink-lots-of-water (accessed on 01/31/2015)

http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/microsites/salt/Home/Whysaltisbad/Saltseffects (accessed on 01/31/2015)

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-info/healthyliving/diet-healthy-eating-and-cancer/how-healthy-eating-could-reduce-cancer-risk/diet-and-cancer-different-foods-and-nutrients#Salt (accessed on 01/31/2015)

Helpful Peer-Reviewed Medical Articles:

Daly, M. (2013). How to Detox Your Taste Buds.

Rosenthal, J. (2016). Crack the Code on Cravings: What Your Cravings Really Mean. Hay House, Inc.

Jones, H. K. (2011). The Salt Solution Diet: Break your salt addiction so you can lose weight, get your energy back, and live longer!. Rodale.

Mackie, B. (2008). Kicking the salt addiction. BRITISH COLUMBIA MEDICAL JOURNAL, 50(2), 64.

Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: Jan. 4, 2017
Last updated: Jan. 4, 2017