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New Interactive Map Shows Vaccines Could Have Stopped Outbreaks

Last updated Sept. 22, 2015

Approved by: Maulik P. Purohit MD MPH

To not have their children vaccinated because it causes autism and attention deficit hyperactive disorder with little to no evidence. A new interactive map created by the Council on Foreign Relations shows all of the world’s outbreaks from 2006 to today that could have been prevented by the recommended vaccinations.


For several years, vaccine skeptics have posted blogs and articles recommending people to not have their children vaccinated because it causes autism and attention deficit hyperactive disorder with little to no evidence.

A new interactive map created by the Council on Foreign Relations shows all of the world’s outbreaks from 2006 to today that could have been prevented by the recommended vaccinations. The map allows users to look at outbreaks across the globe based on year, location, number of victims, and illness type.

The data show western and southern Africa with epidemics like measles and cholera. India, Pakistan, Indonesia, and the Philippines have their fair share of measles as well. The Los Angeles Times reports that despite the availability of the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine, measles is prevalent in both Britain and the U.S.

The United States also has a high influx of whooping cough compared to other countries like Afghanistan and Sudan. Wisconsin and California have a combined 17,000 cases of whooping cough between 2011 and 2013. One study concluded that nonmedical vaccination exemptions may have been one of the "several factors in the 2010 California pertussis [whooping cough] resurgence.

These preventable epidemics are "an artifact of the anti-vaccination movement, which has associated the vaccine with autism," the LA Times' Michael Hiltzik wrote. "That connection, promoted by the discredited British physician Andrew Wakefield and the starlet Jenny McCarthy, has been thoroughly debunked. But its effects live on, as the [CFR] map shows."

Mayo Clinic wrote on its website, “Vaccines do not cause autism. Despite much controversy on the topic, researchers haven’t found a connection between autism and childhood vaccines. In fact, the original study that ignited the debate years ago has been retracted.”

Council on Foreign Relations website:

http://www.cfr.org/interactives/GH_Vaccine_Map/#

Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: Jan. 27, 2014
Last updated: Sept. 22, 2015