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Osteitis Fibrosa Disseminata

Last updated June 23, 2020

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Fibrous Dysplasia is a congenital, non-hereditary, progressive, skeletal disorder (bone disease), when the normal bone is replaced by a structurally weak fibrous tissue. It can cause deformity of the bones leading to fractures.


The topic Osteitis Fibrosa Disseminata you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Fibrous Dysplasia.

Quick Summary:

  • Fibrous Dysplasia is a congenital, non-hereditary, progressive, skeletal disorder (bone disease), when the normal bone is replaced by a structurally weak fibrous tissue. It can cause deformity of the bones leading to fractures
  • Normally, one or more bones are affected. The bones that are usually affected are the bones of the skull, face, thigh, shin, ribs, upper arm, and pelvis
  • The complications of Fibrous Dysplasia include bone deformity such as scoliosis, arthritis, hearing and vision loss due to involvement of the skull bones, and rarely, cancer of the bone
  • The treatment depends upon the presence of symptoms. Generally, no treatment is required in asymptomatic cases. The prognosis is dependent upon the severity of the disorder
  • Currently, there are no known methods to prevent Fibrous Dysplasia

The types of Fibrous Dysplasia include:

  • Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia: When only a single bone is involved
  • Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia: When multiple bones are involved
  • McCune-Albright syndrome: It is classified as a type of Fibrous Dysplasia. McCune-Albright syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition, where Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia occurs with pigmented skin lesions and hormonal abnormalities

Please find comprehensive information on Fibrous Dysplasia regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

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Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: June 14, 2017
Last updated: June 23, 2020