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Margarita Photodermatitis

Last updated June 11, 2017

Reviewed by: Lester Fahrner, MD

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

Phytophotodermatitis (PPD) is a common condition that is caused when there is an accidental or intentional contact with certain plants or plant products followed by sun exposure, which results in skin inflammation and burning sensation.


The topic Margarita Photodermatitis you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Phytophotodermatitis.

Quick Summary:

  • Phytophotodermatitis (PPD) is a common condition that is caused when there is an accidental or intentional contact with certain plants or plant products followed by sun exposure, which results in skin inflammation and burning sensation
  • Phytophotodermatitis is a common skin condition. It is named after the terms “phyto” indicating plant, “photo” indicating light, and “dermatitis” indicating skin inflammation
  • Some common plants and plant products that can trigger the condition include citrus fruits, vegetables such as carrots and celery, and some plant oils and fragrances
  • Some of the common signs and symptoms include red rashes and bumps on the skin, lesions or patches that resemble burns, and the presence of blisters that drain fluid. A superimposed bacterial or fungal infection can be a complication of Phytophotodermatitis
  • The treatment of Phytophotodermatitis involves a complete avoidance of the causative agent and the use of medications that may include corticosteroids and antihistamines. The condition typically resolves in a short period of time, usually without any complications
  • Identification of plants and plant-based products that are skin allergens and irritants is the first and foremost preventive measure

Please find comprehensive information on Phytophotodermatitis regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

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Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: June 11, 2017
Last updated: June 11, 2017