×

Please Remove Adblock
Adverts are the main source of Revenue for DoveMed. Please remove adblock to help us create the best medical content found on the Internet.

Aphthous Stomatitis

Last updated March 20, 2018

Approved by: Krish Tangella MD, MBA, FCAP

A Canker Sore is a benign lesion that develops in one’s mouth, at the base of the gums, under the tongue, on the inside of the cheeks, on the roof of the mouth, or on the inside of the lips. It is mainly caused by an injury to the mouth. Canker sores are not contagious and cannot be transmitted from one individual to another.


The topic Aphthous Stomatitis you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the medical condition Canker Sore.

Quick Summary:

  • A Canker Sore is a benign lesion that develops in one’s mouth, at the base of the gums, under the tongue, on the inside of the cheeks, on the roof of the mouth, or on the inside of the lips
  • Any individual can develop a Canker Sore, but they are seen mostly in children and young adults. The risk factors for the condition may include family history of Canker Sores and allergic reactions to certain substances in the mouth
  • Canker Sores are mainly caused by injury to the mouth. It can also be associated with foods or any substance that comes in contact with the mouth. Canker Sores are not contagious and do not spread from one individual to another
  • There are 3 types of Canker Sores each with their own set of associated symptoms:
    • Minor Canker Sores: It is the more common form of Canker Sore
    • Major Canker Sores: It is generally larger than a minor sore
    • Herpetiform Canker Sores: This type is more uncommon than both the minor or major sore
  • Canker Sores are generally identified or diagnosed on a visual examination. In case it is required, additional tests, such as a biopsy, may be required to confirm the diagnosis
  • Small Canker Sores usually go away or recede spontaneously. The healing period depends on the type of sore. When necessary, certain gels and pastes can be used to speed up recovery
  • Canker Sores can be prevented by avoiding injury to the mouth and by avoiding spicy food. However, an individual can develop a Canker Sore 2 to 3 times a year, or continually one after another
  • The prognosis with adequate treatment is generally good, irrespective of the type of the Canker Sore. Most ulcers heal within 2 weeks, while some may take longer

Note: Canker Sores should not be confused with cold sores. Cold sores are caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) and can be passed on from one individual to another.

Please find comprehensive information on Canker Sore regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis, and additional useful information HERE.

What are some Useful Resources for Additional Information?


References and Information Sources used for the Article:


Helpful Peer-Reviewed Medical Articles:


Reviewed and Approved by a member of the DoveMed Editorial Board
First uploaded: July 20, 2017
Last updated: March 20, 2018